BAEDC: Unique Celebration of May 24th

Wednesday, 27 May 2015 06:32 Written by


  

The Bay Area Eritreans for Democratic Change (BAEDC) celebrated May 24th this year in a very unique way. Traditionally, BAEDC celebrates in fanfare and with known musicians. This year has been different in all measures to the worst for the Eritrean people have suffered immensely. The Eritrean people amassed sad news to sad news day and day out for the last few years. This year top them the most. Drowning in the Mediterranean Sea in mass has become the norm life. Beheading by Islamic extremists is a new addition to the suffering. This cohort action hits into the heart of the Eritrean interwoven community. Dealing with such plight and suffering, does one need dancing and parting? Parting for what end? What is the meaning of independence when the essence of life under independence is enslavement? What is the meaning of independence when the owners are hunted by their own government and weathered by the scorch of the desert and swallowed by the deep seas? What is independence when it is synonyms with hell, enslavement, oppression, persecution, absolute dictatorship etc.? Dancing is not an answer to those questions. Because of those who parish in the Mediterranean Sea and those who were beheaded in Libya, BAEDC planned to celebrate May 24th in a unique way.

BAEDC has canceled the scheduled fanfare celebration for independence day, and instead replaced it with a solemn way by remembering those who parish seeking the light of freedom. Yes, seeking freedom. The owners of independent Eritrea have been fleeing the country for years in mass to seek freedom. Eritrean independence in essence is only replacing Eritrean flag to colonial. Thus, BAEDC presented human trafficking documentary prepared by Meron Stefanos. The documentary shows the brutality, inhuman and evil atrocities roots. As sad as it is, the documentary is evidence of how the Eritrean youth is encountering the atrocities weaved by PFDJ thugs. This documentary is a MUST see for all Eritreans.

After the documentary, BAEDC members discussed on how to work together. Discussions focused on how to avoid side issues and instead to focus on the big elephant in the room. BAEDC board assured members that more engaging meeting that are focused on harmonizing the opposition will follow.

In conclusion, participants were very satisfied by the boards plan. It was very gratifying to remember those children, unborn children, pregnant women, young mothers, youth and elders who lost their lives because of PFDJ’s atrocious actions.   

 

The Dreams of those who perish will come true only by us!

MAY 24 meant to be a day that we Eritreans should celebrate our hard won independence. Yes, We are “nationally” independent; we are a country; we have a flag, we have a passport; and we have a name – ERITREANS. An accomplishment of a generation indeed. BUT, was that all? Was our vision of a nation and a society that short and that small?

WHAT happened to us now? What happened with our generation? We disrespect our dead, disregard the living. We fear death when we are half-dead. We are visited daily by grief, sorrow, pain and shame. We cry; continue crying while waiting for another tragedy of a deepening misery.

WHO have we become? Are We still ERITREAN? Are we still HUMANS? When we dance over the bodies of our beloved ones; when we praise the vampire that sacks life out of us; when we remain dehumanized; when our being is killed, our future perishes. Are we really the People? Are we those who did an imaginable deeds to ensure the RIGHT FOR SELF-DETERMINATION?

IF we believe we are ERITREANS defined by our history that we were its makers; IF we believe that we are the people who made May 24 a reality; IF we believe in our unity in diversity; then WHY do We continue to be victims of circumstances; remain divided; filled with fatalism and despondency; indifferent; disillusioned; captured by paralysing fear and unscrupulous opportunism? Have we become “ደርሆስ በምዑት ደቃ ትጻወት?

REMEMBER! We sung with our head up and proud heart; We are the PEOPLE, WE are the NATION; We are the SEA; We are the Mountain; We are the River; We are the Forest; We are the GENERATION. Yes! We are the people, A people of dignity; a people of history; a people of culture; a people of family and a community; a people of the wise; a people of peace; a people of humility and honesty; We are the people part of the HUMANITY.

IT is in our united hands not to be defined by circumstance; IT is in our POWER not to succumb to the evil of the time. The CHOICE is ours not to continue being the people of the present, but the People of HISTORY and FUTURE. Eritreans! The choice is ours to be true to our generation’s mission and reborn as CITIZENS with full rights and responsibility equal in humanity.

THE CHOICE IS OURS on MAY 24, a historical day, to dialogue and reconcile with ourselves; redefine our being as a PEOPLE WITH POWER to design our destiny and our future that MUST be BRIGHTER! In fact, We have no choice, but to “… discover our mission, fulfil it …” (Frantz Fanon)

24 May 2015

Pretoria, South Africa

In a couple of days Eritrea will celebrate the 24th anniversary of its hard won independence. This is a day Eritreans celebrate passionately for the hefty price they have paid for freedom and justice. It was in May 1991 that Eritrea’s protracted struggle for independence came to a successful end with the liberation of the country from Ethiopian occupation. The country’s formal independence was declared two years later following the 1993 national referendum in which 99.8% Eritreans voted in favour of independence. In a continent that is ravaged by war, poverty and corruption, for its endurance and some of the achievements it had recorded in the revolution years, an independent Eritrea was hailed to be a symbol for African renaissance.

For Eritreans, the independence of their country signalled the end of a dark era in which their suffering and a prolonged war and its destruction were closed with triumph, Liberation. Many Eritreans assumed that their just cause, tenacity in the revolution years, and their passion for freedom and justice finally paid off. The level of optimism among Eritreans and others was high that the beginning of 1990s was a new kick-off for the emerging nation.

The first decade of Eritrea’s independence was of twofold. In the early years of independence a glimpse of positive signs were noticed. Following independence, the country was facing a huge task of nation building. Rebuilding its war ravaged economy was one of the top priorities. There was also a trend towards a nascent democracy. This was somewhat manifested when a constitution was drafted and ratified by the National Assembly in 1997. An embryonic free press was also evolving allowing the emergence of several private newspapers.

In the dark side of the period, there were cases where public protests - in the events of the 1993 former freedom fighters dissension and the 1994 demonstration of Eritrean disabled fighters - were suppressed by the government. There was also isolated harassment on some Eritrean Muslims which were branded as ‘extremists’ by the government.

The first decade also unfolded Eritrea’s tensions and clashes with three of its neighbours - Sudan, Yemen and Ethiopia - in 1994, 1995, and 1998-2000 respectively. The causes of these problems were complex and beyond the scope of this article. But, considering the fact that the country was coming out of a long and destructive war for independence and in terms of its external relations with its neighbours, this was by no means a good beginning.

The border dispute with Ethiopia has had a devastating effect for Eritrea. In the wake of the border clash the Eritrean government began to march on a different path. The few encouraging signs that the country experienced in the first decade of its independence were quickly overturned. The year 2001 unveiled a rampant attack on civil liberties in Eritrea. The dominating nature of the omnipotent President became well-defined and was clearly unmasked when dissidents from within the government circle, the G-15, were arrested and disappeared from public scene once and for all. They were jailed merely for demanding accountability. Many of these were senior figures in the Eritrean government (ministers, army leaders and MP’s) and comrades in arms of the President himself during the war for independence. Simultaneously, the evolving free press was muffled when all private newspapers were banned and the journalists who worked in these papers were thrown into prison never to be seen again. Protesting university students were also banished into desert prisons and few years later Eritrea’s sole university was closed. Ironically, just within ten years of its independence, the once hailed and promising Eritrea was on a swift path to dictatorship.

Beginning in such a way, the second decade of Eritrea’s independence also highlighted boldly the government’s exploitative nature. In 2002, with a pretext of building the war damaged economy, the Warsai-Yikealo campaign was declared to extend the 18 month bound National Service into a lifelong scheme. The standoff with Ethiopia that followed the border dispute is used as an excuse by the government to prolong the compulsory National Service into an indefinite one. The notorious National Service developed into a system where several human rights abuses against young Eritreans were and still are recorded. Ultimately it becomes one of the main driving causes for many to flee the country.

The past fifteen years clearly witnessed how the Eritrean government turned into a despotic regime. Now Eritrea owns a government that exercise total control over its citizens. Every aspect of the citizens’ livelihood is under the scrutiny of the State which made Eritreans to live under continuous anxiety and despair. Today Eritrea is still a single party state ruled by the People’s Front for Democracy and Justice (PFDJ). It became a country where no elections were held despite it has 24 years as an independent state. This is an odd case even by African standards. Dissent is unthinkable. The people are rather expected to demonstration complete obedience to the government. Eritrea also becomes a country well-known for its repressiveness, human rights abuses and secrecy. It is now characterised as the most censored country in the world by the Committee to Protect Journalist, even beating the infamous North Korea, which holds second place.[1] The never implemented but ratified constitution of 1997 was recently declared dead by a mere statement of the President in an interview.[2]

A vivid weakness of the government is its mishandling of the country’s unique asset, the Eritrean youth. Thousands of young Eritreans, including some children, are fleeing the country in alarming numbers. Currently Eritrea is making the headlines for the migrant crisis in the Mediterranean Sea. Its citizens are second only to Syrians to arrive into the EU through the seashores of Italy. According to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) nearly 37,000 Eritreans applied for asylum in EU in the first 10 months of 2014.[3] This is a shocking figure given Eritrean population of around 5 million. A destructive war can justify the Syrians plight but why do Eritreans flee in these high figures undertaking the dangerous journey through the Sahara desert and the Mediterranean? Many lost their life in this perilous journey. Lampedusa was a case in point. In the recent catastrophe in Mediterranean an estimate 350 Eritreans also perished following another boat disaster. Several Eritreans were killed or abused at the hands of human traffickers in Sinai, Libya and elsewhere. Some others became victims of the barbaric act of ISIS in Libya. Having deprived of the chance to live a peaceful life in their country, many Eritreans refugees are still languishing in several African countries and in Israel. This is the end result of the ruthless repression and pervasive state control in Eritrea.

Every year Eritrea celebrates its well-deserved Independence Day. But the objectives and promises made in the struggle for independence and in the immediate thereafter are grossly betrayed. During the liberation struggle Eritreans paid immensely. They fought long and hard not only to create an independent political entity but also to live, as citizens of a nation, an honourable life where peace, justice, democracy and the rule of law prevailed. The state of affairs in current Eritrea is far away from this. Justice hungry Eritreans are fleeing repression in search of freedom, peace and security elsewhere.

Eritrea and Eritreans will breathe freedom only when the government in Asmara chooses to reverse its march from despotism into democracy and build a transparent political system that adheres to accountability and the rule of law. When it is respecting basic human rights of its own citizens. When it is nurturing a political culture in which stable political institutions and independent civil societies can surface. At least this can be the starting point. The build-up on this then will take us on the journey where we can chase our dreams and the dreams of our fallen martyrs and where we want to be as people and a nation. Otherwise, as long as the current trends are not curtailed Eritrea’s predicament is not going to be ceased sooner.

Unquestionably our hard won independence is a big moment we celebrate but our freedom is yet to come.

Happy Independence day Eritrea.

 


[1] “10 Most Censored Countries” https://cpj.org/2015/04/10-most-censored-countries.php

[2] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pj1zSt7kQ9Q

[3] “Number of Eritreans Seeking Asylum in Europe Soars over figures for last Year” http://www.unhcr.org/546606286.html

Italian Police Arrest 3 Eritrean Ethiopian Human Traffickers

Migrants Seized, Held captive in a house in Comiso,freed after ransom Paid, 5 arrests

www.meridionews.it | MAY 14, 2015

Foreign taken out of the centers, with the promise of being taken to the NorthItaly. Instead they were imprisoned in Ragusa and released after thefamily had paid a ransomof 200 euro. For those arrested areaccused of kidnapping and smuggling of migrants. 

They were arrested at five o'clock this morning. The eldest is a man of Moroccan nationality, Nasrllah Fouad , 43, the other four are younger:Two Eritreans, Abe Nagawo and Mahammed Nur Mohammed Jimie ,Ethiopian, Ayalew Yosef and the Pakistani  Rafique Junaid , all between 26 and 28 years. Together they formed a group that seized migrants and released them after payment of a ransom of two hundred euro . The time now is accused of kidnapping of people and smuggling of migrants .

The investigation began by looking for amigrant child of Eritrean origin. The girl had been received in a structure of Syracuse , where he lived. Monday a relative of the girl, who lives abroad, contacted the police: she had received a telephone call from the young man, who demanded a payment of two hundred euro in a prepaid card. It was the ransom demand so that he might be freed. The police, after the complaint, were put on his trail.

Like her, men and women ofEritrean originare substantial part of migration flow departing from the African continent. Eritrea, a country ruled by the dictator Isaias Afeweki , provides for the mandatory military conscription and permanent – in life – for both men and women.Eritreancriminal organizations are also active in the Italian territory for years. Dealing with illegal repatriations,kidnappings and violence against fellow citizens. Also conspicuous are theEritreancommunity in northern European countries, where in many require and obtain asylum.

By working together, the investigators of Siracusa and Ragusa found the actions of the criminal gang, which used repeatedly strategy: approaching migrants outside the centers of Siracusa and proposed able to take them in northern Italy, in Milan , from where they could reach other European countries with greater ease and a few hundred euro.

The migrants were instead brought in a van in a house in Via Vittorio Veneto in Comiso , they rented under a contract of one of the gang members, who were in possession of a valid permit . Inside the house where they were kidnapped migrants, the police, after surgery, theyfound only bread and water as foodand mattresses is not sufficient for the number of inmates. Until relatives, contacted after the abduction, did not pay the ransom,migrants remained in hostage. Only after they were released and escorted to the bus station in Dubrovnik, where they were boarded on the means to Milan, so that they could finally reach.

To discover them was enough to put under examination the flow of migrants to the square Zama . A group ofEritreanswere departing from Dubrovnik to the chief town of Lombardy. The officers recognized the young through the photos provided by the family and intervened, arresting four of the five members of the organization. The testimony of the girl then provided the information necessary to formalize the accusation against them and to recognize the last component, which was stopped, still unaware of the arrest of accomplices, on his return in the home as a prison. The five men are now in the home district of Ragusa .

Software Translation from Italian

 

Source=http://eastafro.com/2015/05/14/italian-police-arrest-3-eritrean-ethiopian-human-traffickers/

 

Appeasement is the making of concessions to the dictatorial powers in order to avoid chaos and destabilisation. Foreign states will tolerate or even positively assist a dictatorship in order to advance their strategic interests. They may be willing to sell out an oppressed people for their own objectives. Some foreign governments can act against the dictatorships only to gain their own interests and military control over the country.

Appeasement has its roots during the post- world war 1 under the security arrangements approved by the countries who fought the first world war to appease Adolf Hitler but the result was that Hitler become more powerful and started the second world war that has devastated the world. Dictators can benefit or be weakened by international support. The external factors depend on the internal factors. In the case of the Eritrean dictatorship, there are no strong internal resistance movements that can convince the international opinion and get support. Foreign states can actively involve if they see the internal resistance forces begun shaking the dictatorship. The Eritrean opposition in Diaspora couldn't shake the dictator in Eritrea.

Can the policy of appeasement with the Eritrean dictatorship stop its brutal behaviour against its citizens and neighbouring countries? Can the EU development Aid stop the flow of refugees from Eritrea? Is dictatorship the best path for peace and stability in the Horn of African countries? What are the causes to appease the Eritrean dictator at this time? Why do the EU and USA at this time pursuing the path of appeasement with the brutal regime in Eritrea? Because it can be that they see no alternative and they are afraid that the post- dictatorship in Eritrea can create chaos in the RED SEA region similarly like that of Arab spring that happened in 2011.

The recent crisis in Yemen and the Saudi-led coalition has been a window of opportunity to the Eritrean dictatorship. All the countries involved in this crisis are for their own interests not for the oppressed people of Yemen. The same scenario is taking place like that of Iraq under Saddam Hussein. The Eritrean dictators u -turn from supporting the Houthis, Al- Shabab of Somalia and other rebel groups to join the Sauidi-led coalition is to normalize its relations with USA, to get out of its isolation, get lift off UNSC sanctions, recovering diplomatic relations with some neighbouring countries through the mediation of the USA and EU and get some military and economic assistance that can help him to oppress its opposition forces inside Eritrea.

Why do the EU and USA deliberately surrender of a tiny dictator of Eritrea who has brutalized and brutalizing its citizens and have being the root cause of all destabilization both inside and outside Eritrea with all neighbouring countries included the EU and USA is some what difficult to grasp. How much do they trust the Eritrean dictator who can never abide by the rule of law but chaos and conflicts? History tells us that dictators will always take more if you let them or appease them without no preconditions.

As reports from the whole world shows there secret meetings held between the Eritrean dictator and the other actors in the war taking place in Yemen a this time. The Eritrea's dictators visit in Saudia is ask the Saudi-led Coalition to use the Eritrean sea and territory and normalize its relationship with the western world. The EU and USA know well the Eritrean dictator failed to listen their recommendations and requests the past 24 years and have worked against them with forces against peace and stability in the Horn of Africa. He has been sponsoring, arming and training terrorists and if he is helped to stay in power the whole region will be in chaos and turmoil. The EU and USA must respect the UNSC sanctions against the Eritrean dictator and the UNHRC Inquiry Commissions on human rights violations in Eritrea. Any dialogue with the Eritrean dictator must be with strict preconditions.

If the Eritrean brutal dictator normalize its relation with USA and EU what will be the respond of the other neighbouring countries who has been in conflict with Eritrea since its independence under the rule of one man? Will the USA and EU mediate negotiation between Ethiopian government and Eritrean dictator? What about the relationship between Djibouti and Eritrea? Sudan And Eritrea?

What is the position of the Eritrean opposition in diaspora? The point is here that this is the time that the democratic Eritrean opposition must work hard politically and diplomatically so that the EU and USA stop their unjustified appeasement and support the Eritrean people to be free in their own country.

 
Burundi Protests
A protester throws fuel on a shop kiosk dragged into the road to form a barricade in the Cibitoke neighborhood of Bujumbura on May 7, 2015. Photographer: Phil Moore /AFP via Getty Images
 

Protests in African countries from Burkina Faso to Burundi have been sparked by youthful populations with little hope of employment and by leaders who have in some cases ruled for decades.

The discontent, which began in Burkina Faso in October, spread to the Democratic Republic of Congo in January, and has now crossed the continent to Burundi, prompting regional leaders to call an emergency meeting after two weeks of protests and at least 14 deaths. Mass demonstrations in Burkina Faso ended Blaise Compaore’s 27 years in power.

“Underpinning a lot of these protests is anger about stalled development, rising food prices and cutting fuel subsidies,” Clive Gabay, an expert on African politics at the Queen Mary University of London, said. “You have this youthful, unemployed population that has been sidelined.”

While sub-Saharan Africa has grown faster than every region except developing Asia in the past 10 years, there aren’t enough jobs for the 1 billion people on the continent. An extra 450 million jobs need to be created in the next 20 years to match the expansion in the number of working-age people in the region, the International Monetary Fund said last month.

Monitoring Elections

About 40 percent of people in Africa are under 15 years old, the most of any region, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. The unemployment rate for people 15 to 25 years old living in Burundi’s capital, Bujumbura, is three times higher than the rest of the working population, according to the African Development Bank.

Rwandan President Paul Kagame has warned that the violence in neighboring Burundi threatens stability in East Africa. Youths have led two weeks of protests to prevent President Pierre Nkurunziza from seeking a third term in office next month. The Constitutional Court approved his request, despite the opposition claiming it violates a 15-year-old peace agreement that sets a two-term limit. Nkurunziza submitted his candidacy for the June 26 vote to the electoral commission on Friday.

The nations that will probably watch closely what happens in Burundi are those with elections scheduled in the next two years, said Yolande Bouka, a researcher on conflict prevention at the Institute for Security Studies in Johannesburg. Congo, Rwanda and Tanzania and Uganda all have polls during that period.

Protest Risk

There is “serious discontent with the type of governance offered by the leaders,” Bouka said. Given the large youth population and unemployment rate “it is not surprising that people take to the street to address unresponsive government.”

Burundi ranks eighth-lowest on the United Nations Human Development Index, which measures indicators such as income, child mortality and education. Congo is second-to-last on the 190-member list.

“In many countries it’s a risky thing to go on a protest and you’re not going to risk getting arrested or shot unless there’s something real at stake,” Gabay said. “There’s something else that’s propelling people onto the street and for me they’re economic issues.”

Using social media like Twitter and Facebook, young activists can mobilize faster than in years gone by and can collaborate across borders. The movements in Congo and Burkina Faso draw inspiration from Senegalese artists, who began protests in 2011 against power outages. The Senegalese movement was key in mobilizing youth to vote President Abdoulaye Wade, who had ruled for 12 years, out of power a year later.

Life Presidents

Demonstrations erupted in Congo in January when lawmakers tried to change electoral laws in a way that could have delayed elections. That would have extended the 14-year rule of President Joseph Kabila, who took over when his father was assassinated in 2001.

Congolese activists met with artists and musicians from Senegal and Burkina Faso in March. The police arrested them in the Congolese capital and accused them of “promoting violence.” Kabila, who faced criticism from international rights monitors including New York-based Human Rights Watch, said he will not run for office next year.

While there are countries in sub-Saharan Africa with leaders who have been in power for more than three decades, including Zimbabwe, Angola and Equatorial Guinea, political opposition groups there say they are suppressed.

Rwanda’s Kagame, who has been president since 2000, also hasn’t faced popular opposition as he says he is open to staying another term. Parliament is reviewing a petition signed by 2 million people who support changing the constitution to allow for a third term.

“African people are tired of presidents who aren’t delivering to their people and they’re tired of presidents who want to stay for life,” Thierry Vircoulon, Central Africa director for the International Crisis Group, said by phone from Nairobi, Kenya. “There’s a sort of exasperation because governments aren’t delivering.”

Source=http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2015-05-11/protests-threatening-african-leaders-fueled-by-economic-woes

Whatisonblueorg

posted onFRI 8 MAY 2015 4:30 PM

On Monday (11 May) the Council will receive a briefing by Federica Mogherini, the EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, on the EU response to the smuggling of migrants in the Mediterranean Sea. After the briefing, Council members are expected to hold an informal interactive dialogue with her. At the request of Chad, the permanent observer of the AU to the UN, Ambassador Tete António, will also participate in these meetings.

This briefing comes after the 19 April incident in which more than 700 migrants drowned when the overcrowded boat on which they were traveling sank near Libya. According to the Integrational Organization for Migration, more than 1,700 migrants have drowned since the beginning of January in the Mediterranean Sea. In a 21 April press statement, Council members expressed grave concern at the smuggling of migrants off the coast of Libya, highlighting the implications for regional stability. On 22 April, at the request of the UK, Council members exchanged views on this issue under “any other business”.
Mogherini is expected to brief Council members on the integrated strategy by the EU to address the smuggling of migrants in the Mediterranean Sea. The strategy includes the provision of bilateral development assistance to countries on the southern and eastern Mediterranean basin—as well as to countries of origin and transit—while tripling the financial resources available to operations Triton and Poseidon, currently existing in the territorial waters of EU member states. In a 20 April joint meeting of EU foreign and interior Ministers, chaired by Mogherini, the Home Affairs and Citizenship Commissioner Dimitris Avramopoulos of Greece presented a plan to respond to migrant smuggling in the Mediterranean, which would entail a systematic effort to capture and destroy vessels used by the smugglers, inspired by the EU Atalanta Operation deployed to fight against piracy off the coast of Somalia. The plan was endorsed in a 23 April meeting of the EU Council, and negotiations are ongoing at the EU to agree on the Crisis Management Concept, which is the basis for operational planning and conduct of any EU mission.

Since that meeting, discussions among EU members of the Council (France, Lithuania, Spain, and the UK) and Italy on a draft resolution apparently authorising such an operation have been ongoing. It seems some permanent members have been able to provide inputs. It appears the idea is for a Chapter VII resolution that will authorise an EU operation to use all necessary measures to inspect, seize and dispose of vessels when there are grounds to believe that they are participating in the smuggling of migrants. The draft may be circulated to the wider membership of the Council in the coming days.

Although most Council members have not seen the draft text, they are aware of some of its elements and are expected to seek information that might feed into any negotiations of the draft. Council members are likely to want to know more about the expected geographical scope of the resolution (whether this includes the high seas, the territorial waters of Libya or even its shore) and whether the EU is seeking Libya’s consent. In this context, Council members might inquire about Mogherini’s recent conversations in Tunisia with Libyan political actors, and the potential impact of such an operation on the political process. Some Council members might be worried that asking for the consent of the Tobruk-based government could negatively impact the talks, which are aimed at the formation of a government of national unity.

Some Council members may echo concerns regarding the protection of human rights and international refugee law that have been raised by the Secretary-General as well as the UN High Commissioners for Human Rights and Refugees. In particular, they might ask about the fate of the migrants taken into custody, and note the importance of respecting the guarantees of international law, notably the 1951 Refugee Convention and the principle of non-refoulement. When the programme of work was adopted, a briefing by the High Commissioner for Refugees, along with the head of the UN Office on Drugs and Crime, was being considered for some point in May. Some Council members may have expected these briefings to happen before engaging in discussions about the regional responses to the smuggling of migrants; however, at press time, it was unclear if and when they will be held.

In the past, it has been difficult to get agreement on resolutions authorising the interception of vessels, whether in the context of the implementation of sanctions or counter-piracy measures. Some Council members feel strongly about not contravening the freedom of navigation principle codified in the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea. As such, they have tended to focus their discussions in the past on issues such as the procedures to authorise the interdiction, whether the consent of the flag state is required, and where the interdiction is authorised to happen.

A Saudi war fought with Eritrean troops?

Mohammad Abu Fares Date of publication: 8 May, 2015
Analysis: Saudi Arabia has been cosying up to Eritrea, leading to reports the African nation will join Senegal in offering troops for the war in Yemen, says Mohammad Abu Fares.

Eritrea could be the second non-Arab African nation to contribute troops to the Saudi-led alliance against Houthi rebels in Yemen.

Eritrea's president Isaias Afwerki visited Riyadh last week to meet King Salman and other leading Saudi officials. This has led many to believe that Eritrea could follow Senegal's lead - the West African nation announced earlier this week that it would send 2,100 soldiers to join the Saudi alliance.

Sources in Asmara revealed to al-Araby al-Jadeed that talks between Eritrean and Saudi officials has brought them to a common understandings on a number of strategic and security related issues.

Sources expect an announcement on military cooperation between the two states, which would allow the alliance to use Eritrean airspace and seas.

It is also being said that Saudi is hoping to capitalise on the capabilities of the Eritrean armed forces.

Strategically important

Eritrea occupies an important geographically location on the Horn of Africa.

It lies just over the water from Yemen, looking over one of the most strategically important sea corridors in the world - where the Red Sea leads to the Suez Canal.

Eritrea would be an obvious launchpad for amphibious attacks if Saudi Arabia wanted to being a ground war.

Saudi Arabia has built good relations with three other Red Sea states share maritime borders with Yemen - Djibouti, Somalia and Ethiopia. Eritrea was the fourth piece in the jigsaw and has hosted foreign troops before.

Israel and Iran have military bases in Eritrea, but as the tide turns against the Tehran-backed Houthi militias in Yemen, Asmara appears to be cutting ties with these countries.

"Afwerki's controversial relations have continued to be a source of angst for Saudi Arabia, which is just a strip of sea away from Eritrea," said one Arab diplomat who wanted to remain anonymous.

     Eritrea was said to be, secretly at least, on the side of ally Iran and the Houthis.http://goo.gl/UtXjhh&via=alaraby_en" class="TweetIcon">


"Saudi Arabia worries when Eritrean-Israeli relations progressed, which led to... the presence of Israeli bases in Dahlak and other Eritrean islands just off the Saudi coast. Relations between the two countries hit their lowest level."

Eritrea was said to be, secretly at least, on the side of ally Iran and the Houthis during the Saudi-led assault on Yemen.

However, observers believe that Afwerki's visit to Riyadh has turned the tables and that Eritrea might be sending signals to the US that it is eager to be friends.

Influential groups in Eritrea have been suspected of supporting Somalia's al-Qaeda-linked al-Shabaab.

Some African diplomats were not surprised by the turnaround. Gulf nations were said to have been heavily involved in negotiations with African countries allied to Asmara in the build up to the visit.

Qatar has been effective in leading talks between Eritrea and some of its hostile neighbours.

The diplomats believe that the talks with Saudi Arabia is an attempt by Asmara to break its international isolation.

This has been enforced through UN resolution 1907, which imposed sanctions on Eritrea over its role in Somalia and refusal to pull its troops out of Djibouti.

With 200,000 soldiers and 12,000 naval personnel, and commanders experienced from Eritrea's war with Ethiopia, the country could provide the backbone of a coalition invasion force.

The fact that they are ruled by an absolute dictator and dissent in the country has been crushed, then Eritrea would not be faced with a repeat of the Pakistani parliament's refusal to engage in Saudi's war in Yemen.

This article is an edited translation from our Arabic edition.

- See more at: http://www.alaraby.co.uk/english/politics/2015/5/8/a-saudi-war-fought-with-eritrean-troops-#sthash.2ReOM9Uj.dpuf
A Saudi war fought with Eritrean troops?

Eritrea fought Ethiopia during the 1990s [AFP]

- See more at: http://www.alaraby.co.uk/english/politics/2015/5/8/a-saudi-war-fought-with-eritrean-troops-#sthash.MFra3qKI.dpufAnalysis: Saudi Arabia has been cosying up to Eritrea, leading to reports the African nation will join Senegal in offering troops for the war in Yemen, says Mohammad Abu Fares.

 

A Saudi war fought with Eritrean troops?

Eritrea fought Ethiopia during the 1990s [AFP]

- See more at: http://www.alaraby.co.uk/english/politics/2015/5/8/a-saudi-war-fought-with-eritrean-troops-#sthash.2ReOM9Uj.dpufEritrea could be the second non-Arab African nation to contribute troops to the Saudi-led alliance against Houthi rebels in Yemen.

Analysis: Saudi Arabia has been cosying up to Eritrea, leading to reports the African nation will join Senegal in offering troops for the war in Yemen, says Mohammad Abu Fares.

Eritrea could be the second non-Arab African nation to contribute troops to the Saudi-led alliance against Houthi rebels in Yemen.

Eritrea's president Isaias Afwerki visited Riyadh last week to meet King Salman and other leading Saudi officials. This has led many to believe that Eritrea could follow Senegal's lead - the West African nation announced earlier this week that it would send 2,100 soldiers to join the Saudi alliance.

Sources in Asmara revealed to al-Araby al-Jadeed that talks between Eritrean and Saudi officials has brought them to a common understandings on a number of strategic and security related issues.

Sources expect an announcement on military cooperation between the two states, which would allow the alliance to use Eritrean airspace and seas.

It is also being said that Saudi is hoping to capitalise on the capabilities of the Eritrean armed forces.

Strategically important

Eritrea occupies an important geographically location on the Horn of Africa.

It lies just over the water from Yemen, looking over one of the most strategically important sea corridors in the world - where the Red Sea leads to the Suez Canal.

Eritrea would be an obvious launchpad for amphibious attacks if Saudi Arabia wanted to being a ground war.

Saudi Arabia has built good relations with three other Red Sea states share maritime borders with Yemen - Djibouti, Somalia and Ethiopia. Eritrea was the fourth piece in the jigsaw and has hosted foreign troops before.

Israel and Iran have military bases in Eritrea, but as the tide turns against the Tehran-backed Houthi militias in Yemen, Asmara appears to be cutting ties with these countries.

"Afwerki's controversial relations have continued to be a source of angst for Saudi Arabia, which is just a strip of sea away from Eritrea," said one Arab diplomat who wanted to remain anonymous.

"Saudi Arabia worries when Eritrean-Israeli relations progressed, which led to... the presence of Israeli bases in Dahlak and other Eritrean islands just off the Saudi coast. Relations between the two countries hit their lowest level."

Eritrea was said to be, secretly at least, on the side of ally Iran and the Houthis during the Saudi-led assault on Yemen.

However, observers believe that Afwerki's visit to Riyadh has turned the tables and that Eritrea might be sending signals to the US that it is eager to be friends.

Influential groups in Eritrea have been suspected of supporting Somalia's al-Qaeda-linked al-Shabaab.

Some African diplomats were not surprised by the turnaround. Gulf nations were said to have been heavily involved in negotiations with African countries allied to Asmara in the build up to the visit.

Qatar has been effective in leading talks between Eritrea and some of its hostile neighbours.

The diplomats believe that the talks with Saudi Arabia is an attempt by Asmara to break its international isolation.

This has been enforced through UN resolution 1907, which imposed sanctions on Eritrea over its role in Somalia and refusal to pull its troops out of Djibouti.

With 200,000 soldiers and 12,000 naval personnel, and commanders experienced from Eritrea's war with Ethiopia, the country could provide the backbone of a coalition invasion force.

The fact that they are ruled by an absolute dictator and dissent in the country has been crushed, then Eritrea would not be faced with a repeat of the Pakistani parliament's refusal to engage in Saudi's war in Yemen.

This article is an edited translation from our Arabic edition.

source=http://www.alaraby.co.uk/english/politics/2015/5/8/a-saudi-war-fought-with-eritrean-troops-

 

 

A Saudi war fought with Eritrean troops?

By: Mohammad Abu Fares Date of publication: 8 May, 2015
Analysis: Saudi Arabia has been cosying up to Eritrea, leading to reports the African nation will join Senegal in offering troops for the war in Yemen, says Mohammad Abu Fares.

Eritrea could be the second non-Arab African nation to contribute troops to the Saudi-led alliance against Houthi rebels in Yemen.

Eritrea's president Isaias Afwerki visited Riyadh last week to meet King Salman and other leading Saudi officials. This has led many to believe that Eritrea could follow Senegal's lead - the West African nation announced earlier this week that it would send 2,100 soldiers to join the Saudi alliance.

Sources in Asmara revealed to al-Araby al-Jadeed that talks between Eritrean and Saudi officials has brought them to a common understandings on a number of strategic and security related issues.

Sources expect an announcement on military cooperation between the two states, which would allow the alliance to use Eritrean airspace and seas.

It is also being said that Saudi is hoping to capitalise on the capabilities of the Eritrean armed forces.

Strategically important

Eritrea occupies an important geographically location on the Horn of Africa.

It lies just over the water from Yemen, looking over one of the most strategically important sea corridors in the world - where the Red Sea leads to the Suez Canal.

Eritrea would be an obvious launchpad for amphibious attacks if Saudi Arabia wanted to being a ground war.

Saudi Arabia has built good relations with three other Red Sea states share maritime borders with Yemen - Djibouti, Somalia and Ethiopia. Eritrea was the fourth piece in the jigsaw and has hosted foreign troops before.

Israel and Iran have military bases in Eritrea, but as the tide turns against the Tehran-backed Houthi militias in Yemen, Asmara appears to be cutting ties with these countries.

"Afwerki's controversial relations have continued to be a source of angst for Saudi Arabia, which is just a strip of sea away from Eritrea," said one Arab diplomat who wanted to remain anonymous.

     Eritrea was said to be, secretly at least, on the side of ally Iran and the Houthis.


"Saudi Arabia worries when Eritrean-Israeli relations progressed, which led to... the presence of Israeli bases in Dahlak and other Eritrean islands just off the Saudi coast. Relations between the two countries hit their lowest level."

Eritrea was said to be, secretly at least, on the side of ally Iran and the Houthis during the Saudi-led assault on Yemen.

However, observers believe that Afwerki's visit to Riyadh has turned the tables and that Eritrea might be sending signals to the US that it is eager to be friends.

Influential groups in Eritrea have been suspected of supporting Somalia's al-Qaeda-linked al-Shabaab.

Some African diplomats were not surprised by the turnaround. Gulf nations were said to have been heavily involved in negotiations with African countries allied to Asmara in the build up to the visit.

Qatar has been effective in leading talks between Eritrea and some of its hostile neighbours.

The diplomats believe that the talks with Saudi Arabia is an attempt by Asmara to break its international isolation.

This has been enforced through UN resolution 1907, which imposed sanctions on Eritrea over its role in Somalia and refusal to pull its troops out of Djibouti.

With 200,000 soldiers and 12,000 naval personnel, and commanders experienced from Eritrea's war with Ethiopia, the country could provide the backbone of a coalition invasion force.

The fact that they are ruled by an absolute dictator and dissent in the country has been crushed, then Eritrea would not be faced with a repeat of the Pakistani parliament's refusal to engage in Saudi's war in Yemen.

This article is an edited translation from our Arabic edition.

- See more at: http://www.alaraby.co.uk/english/politics/2015/5/8/a-saudi-war-fought-with-eritrean-troops-#sthash.2ReOM9Uj.dpuf

A Saudi war fought with Eritrean troops?

By: Mohammad Abu Fares Date of publication: 8 May, 2015
Analysis: Saudi Arabia has been cosying up to Eritrea, leading to reports the African nation will join Senegal in offering troops for the war in Yemen, says Mohammad Abu Fares.

Eritrea could be the second non-Arab African nation to contribute troops to the Saudi-led alliance against Houthi rebels in Yemen.

Eritrea's president Isaias Afwerki visited Riyadh last week to meet King Salman and other leading Saudi officials. This has led many to believe that Eritrea could follow Senegal's lead - the West African nation announced earlier this week that it would send 2,100 soldiers to join the Saudi alliance.

Sources in Asmara revealed to al-Araby al-Jadeed that talks between Eritrean and Saudi officials has brought them to a common understandings on a number of strategic and security related issues.

Sources expect an announcement on military cooperation between the two states, which would allow the alliance to use Eritrean airspace and seas.

It is also being said that Saudi is hoping to capitalise on the capabilities of the Eritrean armed forces.

Strategically important

Eritrea occupies an important geographically location on the Horn of Africa.

It lies just over the water from Yemen, looking over one of the most strategically important sea corridors in the world - where the Red Sea leads to the Suez Canal.

Eritrea would be an obvious launchpad for amphibious attacks if Saudi Arabia wanted to being a ground war.

Saudi Arabia has built good relations with three other Red Sea states share maritime borders with Yemen - Djibouti, Somalia and Ethiopia. Eritrea was the fourth piece in the jigsaw and has hosted foreign troops before.

Israel and Iran have military bases in Eritrea, but as the tide turns against the Tehran-backed Houthi militias in Yemen, Asmara appears to be cutting ties with these countries.

"Afwerki's controversial relations have continued to be a source of angst for Saudi Arabia, which is just a strip of sea away from Eritrea," said one Arab diplomat who wanted to remain anonymous.

     Eritrea was said to be, secretly at least, on the side of ally Iran and the Houthis.


"Saudi Arabia worries when Eritrean-Israeli relations progressed, which led to... the presence of Israeli bases in Dahlak and other Eritrean islands just off the Saudi coast. Relations between the two countries hit their lowest level."

Eritrea was said to be, secretly at least, on the side of ally Iran and the Houthis during the Saudi-led assault on Yemen.

However, observers believe that Afwerki's visit to Riyadh has turned the tables and that Eritrea might be sending signals to the US that it is eager to be friends.

Influential groups in Eritrea have been suspected of supporting Somalia's al-Qaeda-linked al-Shabaab.

Some African diplomats were not surprised by the turnaround. Gulf nations were said to have been heavily involved in negotiations with African countries allied to Asmara in the build up to the visit.

Qatar has been effective in leading talks between Eritrea and some of its hostile neighbours.

The diplomats believe that the talks with Saudi Arabia is an attempt by Asmara to break its international isolation.

This has been enforced through UN resolution 1907, which imposed sanctions on Eritrea over its role in Somalia and refusal to pull its troops out of Djibouti.

With 200,000 soldiers and 12,000 naval personnel, and commanders experienced from Eritrea's war with Ethiopia, the country could provide the backbone of a coalition invasion force.

The fact that they are ruled by an absolute dictator and dissent in the country has been crushed, then Eritrea would not be faced with a repeat of the Pakistani parliament's refusal to engage in Saudi's war in Yemen.

This article is an edited translation from our Arabic edition.

- See more at: http://www.alaraby.co.uk/english/politics/2015/5/8/a-saudi-war-fought-with-eritrean-troops-#sthash.2ReOM9Uj.dpuf

A Saudi war fought with Eritrean troops?

By: Mohammad Abu Fares Date of publication: 8 May, 2015
Analysis: Saudi Arabia has been cosying up to Eritrea, leading to reports the African nation will join Senegal in offering troops for the war in Yemen, says Mohammad Abu Fares.

Eritrea could be the second non-Arab African nation to contribute troops to the Saudi-led alliance against Houthi rebels in Yemen.

Eritrea's president Isaias Afwerki visited Riyadh last week to meet King Salman and other leading Saudi officials. This has led many to believe that Eritrea could follow Senegal's lead - the West African nation announced earlier this week that it would send 2,100 soldiers to join the Saudi alliance.

Sources in Asmara revealed to al-Araby al-Jadeed that talks between Eritrean and Saudi officials has brought them to a common understandings on a number of strategic and security related issues.

Sources expect an announcement on military cooperation between the two states, which would allow the alliance to use Eritrean airspace and seas.

It is also being said that Saudi is hoping to capitalise on the capabilities of the Eritrean armed forces.

Strategically important

Eritrea occupies an important geographically location on the Horn of Africa.

It lies just over the water from Yemen, looking over one of the most strategically important sea corridors in the world - where the Red Sea leads to the Suez Canal.

Eritrea would be an obvious launchpad for amphibious attacks if Saudi Arabia wanted to being a ground war.

Saudi Arabia has built good relations with three other Red Sea states share maritime borders with Yemen - Djibouti, Somalia and Ethiopia. Eritrea was the fourth piece in the jigsaw and has hosted foreign troops before.

Israel and Iran have military bases in Eritrea, but as the tide turns against the Tehran-backed Houthi militias in Yemen, Asmara appears to be cutting ties with these countries.

"Afwerki's controversial relations have continued to be a source of angst for Saudi Arabia, which is just a strip of sea away from Eritrea," said one Arab diplomat who wanted to remain anonymous.

     Eritrea was said to be, secretly at least, on the side of ally Iran and the Houthis.


"Saudi Arabia worries when Eritrean-Israeli relations progressed, which led to... the presence of Israeli bases in Dahlak and other Eritrean islands just off the Saudi coast. Relations between the two countries hit their lowest level."

Eritrea was said to be, secretly at least, on the side of ally Iran and the Houthis during the Saudi-led assault on Yemen.

However, observers believe that Afwerki's visit to Riyadh has turned the tables and that Eritrea might be sending signals to the US that it is eager to be friends.

Influential groups in Eritrea have been suspected of supporting Somalia's al-Qaeda-linked al-Shabaab.

Some African diplomats were not surprised by the turnaround. Gulf nations were said to have been heavily involved in negotiations with African countries allied to Asmara in the build up to the visit.

Qatar has been effective in leading talks between Eritrea and some of its hostile neighbours.

The diplomats believe that the talks with Saudi Arabia is an attempt by Asmara to break its international isolation.

This has been enforced through UN resolution 1907, which imposed sanctions on Eritrea over its role in Somalia and refusal to pull its troops out of Djibouti.

With 200,000 soldiers and 12,000 naval personnel, and commanders experienced from Eritrea's war with Ethiopia, the country could provide the backbone of a coalition invasion force.

The fact that they are ruled by an absolute dictator and dissent in the country has been crushed, then Eritrea would not be faced with a repeat of the Pakistani parliament's refusal to engage in Saudi's war in Yemen.

This article is an edited translation from our Arabic edition.

- See more at: http://www.alaraby.co.uk/english/politics/2015/5/8/a-saudi-war-fought-with-eritrean-troops-#sthash.pklE9cBC.dpuf

A Saudi war fought with Eritrean troops?

Mohammad Abu Fares Date of publication: 8 May, 2015
Analysis: Saudi Arabia has been cosying up to Eritrea, leading to reports the African nation will join Senegal in offering troops for the war in Yemen, says Mohammad Abu Fares.

Eritrea could be the second non-Arab African nation to contribute troops to the Saudi-led alliance against Houthi rebels in Yemen.

Eritrea's president Isaias Afwerki visited Riyadh last week to meet King Salman and other leading Saudi officials. This has led many to believe that Eritrea could follow Senegal's lead - the West African nation announced earlier this week that it would send 2,100 soldiers to join the Saudi alliance.

Sources in Asmara revealed to al-Araby al-Jadeed that talks between Eritrean and Saudi officials has brought them to a common understandings on a number of strategic and security related issues.

Sources expect an announcement on military cooperation between the two states, which would allow the alliance to use Eritrean airspace and seas.

It is also being said that Saudi is hoping to capitalise on the capabilities of the Eritrean armed forces.

Strategically important

Eritrea occupies an important geographically location on the Horn of Africa.

It lies just over the water from Yemen, looking over one of the most strategically important sea corridors in the world - where the Red Sea leads to the Suez Canal.

Eritrea would be an obvious launchpad for amphibious attacks if Saudi Arabia wanted to being a ground war.

Saudi Arabia has built good relations with three other Red Sea states share maritime borders with Yemen - Djibouti, Somalia and Ethiopia. Eritrea was the fourth piece in the jigsaw and has hosted foreign troops before.

Israel and Iran have military bases in Eritrea, but as the tide turns against the Tehran-backed Houthi militias in Yemen, Asmara appears to be cutting ties with these countries.

"Afwerki's controversial relations have continued to be a source of angst for Saudi Arabia, which is just a strip of sea away from Eritrea," said one Arab diplomat who wanted to remain anonymous.

     Eritrea was said to be, secretly at least, on the side of ally Iran and the Houthis.http://goo.gl/UtXjhh&via=alaraby_en" class="TweetIcon">


"Saudi Arabia worries when Eritrean-Israeli relations progressed, which led to... the presence of Israeli bases in Dahlak and other Eritrean islands just off the Saudi coast. Relations between the two countries hit their lowest level."

Eritrea was said to be, secretly at least, on the side of ally Iran and the Houthis during the Saudi-led assault on Yemen.

However, observers believe that Afwerki's visit to Riyadh has turned the tables and that Eritrea might be sending signals to the US that it is eager to be friends.

Influential groups in Eritrea have been suspected of supporting Somalia's al-Qaeda-linked al-Shabaab.

Some African diplomats were not surprised by the turnaround. Gulf nations were said to have been heavily involved in negotiations with African countries allied to Asmara in the build up to the visit.

Qatar has been effective in leading talks between Eritrea and some of its hostile neighbours.

The diplomats believe that the talks with Saudi Arabia is an attempt by Asmara to break its international isolation.

This has been enforced through UN resolution 1907, which imposed sanctions on Eritrea over its role in Somalia and refusal to pull its troops out of Djibouti.

With 200,000 soldiers and 12,000 naval personnel, and commanders experienced from Eritrea's war with Ethiopia, the country could provide the backbone of a coalition invasion force.

The fact that they are ruled by an absolute dictator and dissent in the country has been crushed, then Eritrea would not be faced with a repeat of the Pakistani parliament's refusal to engage in Saudi's war in Yemen.

This article is an edited translation from our Arabic edition.

- See more at: http://www.alaraby.co.uk/english/politics/2015/5/8/a-saudi-war-fought-with-eritrean-troops-#sthash.pklE9cBC.dpuf

A March To San Fransisco Hall

Wednesday, 06 May 2015 23:03 Written by

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